Interestingly, over-activation of the endocannabinoid system, primarily via CB1 receptor activation, contributes to increased abdominal obesity (i.e., fat gain along the midsection), glucose uptake into adipocytes (fat cells), and insulin resistance in muscle tissue. This “metabolic dysfunction” sets up a vicious cycle whereby further insulin resistance in muscles and the liver increases abdominal obesity and further CB1 over-activation, resulting in greater food-seeking behavior, increased appetite, and increased body fat gain.
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Also, please note that CBD should NOT be misunderstood as a miracle cure — and no reputable CBD seller or manufacturer should ever claim otherwise. Furthermore, if you are using CBD for weight loss purposes, don’t expect it to work if you eat fast food three times a day and your exercise routine consists of struggling to twist the cap off your bottle of beer!
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To briefly review, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of specialized fatty acid-based signaling chemicals (think “keys”), their receptors (think “locks”), and the metabolic enzymes that produce and break them down. These endocannabinoid chemical signals act on similar brain and immune cell receptors (CB1 and CB2) using the active compounds found in cannabis – cannabidiol (CBD), and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).


Scientists have only scraped the tip of the iceberg so far. The DEA has recently removed  CBD from its list of controlled substances. This significant event paves the way for government-funded grants that will allow some of the best minds in the world study cannabidiol’s effect on the human body. It will be exciting to see what is uncovered in the years to come. For the time being, evidence points to CBD’s use as a valuable tool for losing weight. And because it is safe and readily available in most places (check your own state to be sure), it is a simple way of supplementing your health as you attempt to shed unwanted pounds.
Dietary changes are the most important action individuals can choose to get off the roller coaster. But CBD could lend a hand in the process. A 2018 study showed that the cannabinoids THC, CBD and CBN enhance cells’ ability to take up glucose. And they perform even better than metformin, a common pharmaceutical prescribed to lower elevated blood glucose.

Due to the uniqueness of everyone’s endocannabinoid system, CBD does not affect any two people the same way. There are a host of factors that influence its efficacy, including genetics, previous history of use, general health, weight, ethnicity and so on. Therefore, while one person may find that 15 mg of CBD a day works wonders for suppressing appetite and boosting weight loss, another may require up to 100 mg (or more) in order to achieve the same results (or they may not experience any results at all).
I asked if he knew why CBD is so broadly effective. Could it be a gigantic, all-purpose placebo? He shook his head. His theory is that it’s an essential nutrient, like vitamins and amino acids, and when there’s a deficiency of CBD, people get sick. Because CBD brings the body into homeostasis, or balance, it can work in two directions: cutting appetite in people who over-eat, and increasing appetite in those who need to eat more.
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