Frankel had rarely tried cannabis until he was 49. He was a partner in one of the most successful practices in West Los Angeles and a clinical professor at UCLA Medical School. He’d been my family’s internist for 15 years, and I found him a skilled diagnostician, who listened carefully, and who cared. He had to quit practicing in 2000, after he’d suffered a disabling back injury, then developed a viral infection of the heart and was told he had six months to live. Some of his cancer and AIDS patients urged him to try cannabis. “They did a reverse intervention,” he said, and a year later, his heart was normal. He can’t be certain how or if cannabis healed his heart. “I’d been depressed and CBD stopped the depression,” he said. “It gave me something to look forward to. My brain was turned on.”
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Cheanné is a freelance writer and blogger. She writes primarily about nutrition, fitness, and mental health. She has diplomas in Personal Nutrition and Weight Loss from Shaw Academy and an Introductory Certificate in Exercise Science from the Health and Fitness Professionals Academy (HFPA). She is also a qualified group fitness instructor. When not writing, she enjoys jamming on her guitar, reading, eating good food, trips to the beach, hiking, and spending time with her family and friends.

On the plus side, there is an earnest desire for people to lose weight, which is why the weight loss industry is worth an astonishing $66 billion! But this staggering number, added to the fact that fewer people are dieting and more are gaining weight, tells us two things: One, that weight loss supplements are fundamentally ineffective; and two, that they are very, very expensive.


For those asking what she uses, I have only been using CBD for a couple weeks, and though I use it for anxiety and back pain, I’m already eating less and losing a little weight as well. I use American Indican(Blueberry OG), but I plan on trying gold Koi soon, because American Indican doesn’t taste too good as a vape, but you can use it as a tincture too, and it DOES taste pretty good that way. I’ve heard Koi brand is more suited to vape, though, and works the same(it can ALSO be used as an under-the-tongue drop, as with American Indican).

In 2013, a team of four medical researchers lead by Dr. Elizabeth Penner MD, MPH, carried out a clinical study with over 4,500 participants, called “The Impact of Marijuana Use on Glucose, Insulin, and Insulin Resistance among US Adults”. They concluded: “We found that marijuana use was associated with lower levels of fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, and smaller waist circumference.”
Frankel had rarely tried cannabis until he was 49. He was a partner in one of the most successful practices in West Los Angeles and a clinical professor at UCLA Medical School. He’d been my family’s internist for 15 years, and I found him a skilled diagnostician, who listened carefully, and who cared. He had to quit practicing in 2000, after he’d suffered a disabling back injury, then developed a viral infection of the heart and was told he had six months to live. Some of his cancer and AIDS patients urged him to try cannabis. “They did a reverse intervention,” he said, and a year later, his heart was normal. He can’t be certain how or if cannabis healed his heart. “I’d been depressed and CBD stopped the depression,” he said. “It gave me something to look forward to. My brain was turned on.”

CBD is not often marketed as a weight loss aid, but studies show that it does have the potential for helping people to shed excess pounds. Cannabidiol has been heavily researched by independent organizations, and anecdotal evidence on its benefits for weight loss are widely available. Yet, until recently, the federal government persisted in classifying it as a controlled substance, even though it is nonaddictive, non-psychoactive, is not mood altering, and is safer than aspirin.
Researchers wrote in 2011 that one of the most important functions of endocannabinoids and CB(1) receptors are to enhance the energy storage conversion into fat and reduce energy expenditure by influencing both lipid and glucose metabolism. Although normally well controlled by hormones etc., the endocannabinoid regulation of energy balance can become dysregulated and contribute to obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes (type 2).

Another marker of obesity and diabetes includes damage to liver cells. The liver is a major organ in the conversion between stored energy forms and useable energy forms in the body. Overburdening that system, such as with high fructose intake, can have disastrous effects. Inflammation within the liver indicates the onset of dysfunction, and possibly non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
He did exhaustive research. He found there’d been decades of scientific studies on the effects of THC and CBD on cells and animals, but few trials with humans, because the FDA classifies cannabis and all its components as Schedule 1 drugs, which have “no accepted medical treatment use.” It took Sue Sisley, an Arizona physician, seven years of struggling with bureaucratic hurdles before she received the first FDA approval for a study, just beginning, of marijuana with vets who have PTSD.
When the endocannabinoid system becomes dysregulated, it often becomes overactive and too much fat is being stored, particularly in the intra-abdominal tissue. Cannabidiol is known to regulate the endocannabinoid system as it can restore balance in both directions. Therefore, the study concludes that, along with lifestyle changes cannabis could be a means of fighting obesity.

Due to the uniqueness of everyone’s endocannabinoid system, CBD does not affect any two people the same way. There are a host of factors that influence its efficacy, including genetics, previous history of use, general health, weight, ethnicity and so on. Therefore, while one person may find that 15 mg of CBD a day works wonders for suppressing appetite and boosting weight loss, another may require up to 100 mg (or more) in order to achieve the same results (or they may not experience any results at all).
Frankel had rarely tried cannabis until he was 49. He was a partner in one of the most successful practices in West Los Angeles and a clinical professor at UCLA Medical School. He’d been my family’s internist for 15 years, and I found him a skilled diagnostician, who listened carefully, and who cared. He had to quit practicing in 2000, after he’d suffered a disabling back injury, then developed a viral infection of the heart and was told he had six months to live. Some of his cancer and AIDS patients urged him to try cannabis. “They did a reverse intervention,” he said, and a year later, his heart was normal. He can’t be certain how or if cannabis healed his heart. “I’d been depressed and CBD stopped the depression,” he said. “It gave me something to look forward to. My brain was turned on.”

With all of the information inundating the internet about CBD oil, many people are curious, can CBD help with weight loss? A study done in 2012 documented the way that cannabinol and cannabidiol affected the feeding patterns in rats. After dosing rats with CBD, the scientists observed that they ate less; this set the stage for more research to be done to continue to show the weight loss opportunities with CBD. It also brought into light a new use for CBD as an appetite suppressant. In addition to that, a report in India Times in 2016 said that cannabis users show a lower rate of obesity and diabetes. Science has also demonstrated links between the use of cannabis and metabolism for many years.


To briefly review, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of specialized fatty acid-based signaling chemicals (think “keys”), their receptors (think “locks”), and the metabolic enzymes that produce and break them down. These endocannabinoid chemical signals act on similar brain and immune cell receptors (CB1 and CB2) using the active compounds found in cannabis – cannabidiol (CBD), and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
Can CBD curb your appetite? Quash anxiety? Protect your heart and brain? Anecdotal evidence for these and other health benefits has created a surge, a potential tsunami of demand for CBD products. While the FDA recently declared CBD an illegal, Schedule 1 drug, it’s being sold in states where medical cannabis is legal, and some companies are shipping it across state lines.
Due to the uniqueness of everyone’s endocannabinoid system, CBD does not affect any two people the same way. There are a host of factors that influence its efficacy, including genetics, previous history of use, general health, weight, ethnicity and so on. Therefore, while one person may find that 15 mg of CBD a day works wonders for suppressing appetite and boosting weight loss, another may require up to 100 mg (or more) in order to achieve the same results (or they may not experience any results at all).
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