Another marker of obesity and diabetes includes damage to liver cells. The liver is a major organ in the conversion between stored energy forms and useable energy forms in the body. Overburdening that system, such as with high fructose intake, can have disastrous effects. Inflammation within the liver indicates the onset of dysfunction, and possibly non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

To briefly review, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of specialized fatty acid-based signaling chemicals (think “keys”), their receptors (think “locks”), and the metabolic enzymes that produce and break them down. These endocannabinoid chemical signals act on similar brain and immune cell receptors (CB1 and CB2) using the active compounds found in cannabis – cannabidiol (CBD), and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).
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CBD is not often marketed as a weight loss aid, but studies show that it does have the potential for helping people to shed excess pounds. Cannabidiol has been heavily researched by independent organizations, and anecdotal evidence on its benefits for weight loss are widely available. Yet, until recently, the federal government persisted in classifying it as a controlled substance, even though it is nonaddictive, non-psychoactive, is not mood altering, and is safer than aspirin.
Interestingly, over-activation of the endocannabinoid system, primarily via CB1 receptor activation, contributes to increased abdominal obesity (i.e., fat gain along the midsection), glucose uptake into adipocytes (fat cells), and insulin resistance in muscle tissue. This “metabolic dysfunction” sets up a vicious cycle whereby further insulin resistance in muscles and the liver increases abdominal obesity and further CB1 over-activation, resulting in greater food-seeking behavior, increased appetite, and increased body fat gain.
It’s important to remember, though, that these areas of study are still very new and in their early stages. This makes it hard to predict just how far their reach and impact will be. Combined with lifestyle and dietary changes, prescribed cannabinoid use will very likely be a pivotal intervention in the future of obesity and diabetes management and recovery.
When the endocannabinoid system becomes dysregulated, it often becomes overactive and too much fat is being stored, particularly in the intra-abdominal tissue. Cannabidiol is known to regulate the endocannabinoid system as it can restore balance in both directions. Therefore, the study concludes that, along with lifestyle changes cannabis could be a means of fighting obesity.
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