It’s important to do full-body strength training if you want to lose belly fat—especially if you’re trying to keep it off for the long haul. “Strength training should be a part of just about everybody’s exercise plan,” says Dr. Cheskin. That’s because strength training helps you build muscle, which will replace body fat. And because muscle is metabolically active, you'll continue to burn calories after working out, thereby, reducing overall body fat. Bonus: When your metabolic rate becomes faster due to muscle growth, you’ll have a little more wiggle room in your diet if that’s something you struggle with, says Dr. Cheskin.
In the pursuit of fast results and shedding unwanted belly fat, many men look to fat-burning supplements to help shift those pesky extra pounds 2. The trouble with this, however, is that not only is spot reduction of fat from a specific area impossible, but fat burners are unlikely to give you more noticeable or faster results than diet and exercise alone.
Many television ads are now pitching devices that supposedly stimulate muscles to contract repeatedly without exercise. I even saw an infomercial for an "ab belt" that claimed it does the work of 700 sit-ups in 10 minutes! The ad shows people doing various abdominal exercises the wrong way, hating every second of it, versus smiling men and women going about their days with "Ab-whatevers" strapped around them. How enticing!

Launched in 2018, Hunter Burn is described as a ‘premium’ fat burner. It’s aimed at the top end of the market and is designed for those looking for larger doses and higher quality ingredients. This comes at increased cost – but does it deliver? Hunter Burn features the largest serving sizes we’ve ever seen, while also using more potent forms of certain key ingredients. Some will want the cheapest on the market. But this is a highly-researched formula for men who are happy to pay more to get the best.
Spending more time in the kitchen can help you shed belly fat, as long as you’re cooking with the right foods, according to a 2017 study. After analyzing data from more than 11,000 men and women, U.K. researchers found that people who ate more than five homemade meals per week were 28 percent less likely to have a high body mass index, and 24 percent less likely to carry too much body fat than those whole only downed three meals at home.
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