Blanket statement: It’s always best to check with your doctor before starting on this regimen. With that said, “the keto diet isn’t recommended for those with liver or kidney disease, or someone with a medical condition, such as a gastrointestinal issue, who can’t metabolize high amounts of dietary fat,” says Sarah Jadin, a Los-Angeles based registered dietitian and founder of Keto Consulting, LLC. If you’ve had your gallbladder removed, the keto diet may be a no-go. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and people with certain rare genetic disorders shouldn’t try this diet.
Quite simply, for the majority of people the answer is a resounding “yes!” Due to its high-fat nature, it is often perceived as a health risk, often deterring individuals from trying it. Despite this misconception, research has demonstrated that the ketogenic diet is safe for most people, providing you don’t have one of the following conditions (even if you have any of these conditions, the ketogenic diet may still be safe, but you would need to work very closely with your doctor):
H. Guldbrand, B. Dizdar, B. Bunjaku, T. Lindström, M. Bachrach-Lindström, M. Fredrikson, C. J. Östgren, F. H. Nystrom, “In Type 2 Diabetes, Randomisation to Advice to Follow a Low-carbohydrate Diet Transiently Improves Glycaemic Control Compared with Advice to Follow a Low-fat Diet Producing a Similar Weight Loss,” Diabetologia (2012) 55: 2118. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-012-2567-4.
A study with an intent-to-treat prospective design was published in 1998 by a team from the Johns Hopkins Hospital[20] and followed-up by a report published in 2001.[21] As with most studies of the ketogenic diet, no control group (patients who did not receive the treatment) was used. The study enrolled 150 children. After three months, 83% of them were still on the diet, 26% had experienced a good reduction in seizures, 31% had had an excellent reduction, and 3% were seizure-free.[Note 7] At 12 months, 55% were still on the diet, 23% had a good response, 20% had an excellent response, and 7% were seizure-free. Those who had discontinued the diet by this stage did so because it was ineffective, too restrictive, or due to illness, and most of those who remained were benefiting from it. The percentage of those still on the diet at two, three, and four years was 39%, 20%, and 12%, respectively. During this period, the most common reason for discontinuing the diet was because the children had become seizure-free or significantly better. At four years, 16% of the original 150 children had a good reduction in seizure frequency, 14% had an excellent reduction, and 13% were seizure-free, though these figures include many who were no longer on the diet. Those remaining on the diet after this duration were typically not seizure-free, but had had an excellent response.[21][22]
A systematic review in 2018 looked at 16 studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence was inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein, high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[24]
There are three instances where there’s research to back up a ketogenic diet, including to help control type 2 diabetes, as part of epilepsy treatment, or for weight loss, says Mattinson. “In terms of diabetes, there is some promising research showing that the ketogenic diet may improve glycemic control. It may cause a reduction in A1C — a key test for diabetes that measures a person’s average blood sugar control over two to three months — something that may help you reduce medication use,” she says.
It can take many weeks for someone to notice differences. If you’re weight training and doing the diet you may not notice weight loss immediately because you are growing muscle and muscle is heavier than fat. Elsewise, for me I went really strict starting out. I did under 30 carbs a day for the first week and measured my ketone levels with the piss sticks you can buy at cvs and was entering ketosis after 3 days. I went up to 40 carbs a day for the next 3 months and lost 60lbs of fat. I was 287 lbs and weighed in at 227 when I finished. Mind you I exercised daily doing heavy weight training and intermediate cardio. The diet does work though. I did put on lean muscle while getting down to a healthy weight for my height. It helped with my panic disorder as well as giving me a lot of energy.
Keep eating low carb to continue losing weight, feeling good and becoming healthier!Try making any of our hundreds of recipes available on the site. We make sure each and every recipe is delicious, nutritious and will keep you under your daily carb limit, even if you go for seconds. In addition, we provide step-by-step instructions to make the process as easy as possible. If you ever run into any issues or have any questions, be sure to leave a comment or contact us directly! We’re always happy to help.
Tip: Consuming a moderate dose of exogenous ketones during the initial “keto-adaptation” period could potentially accelerate the “adaptation,” while at a minimum increasing energy production. Once one is adapted, these products are excellent for achieving higher blood-ketone levels, which, in turn, can be beneficial for athletic and cognitive performance, energy production, and perhaps more effective therapeutic treatment.
As with other facets of the keto diet for beginners, the optimal ketone levels will vary on an individual basis. However, literature typically suggests that mild nutritional ketosis will begin once blood ketones are around 0.3–0.5 mmol/L. Upon “keto-adaptation,” this value may increase to around 1.0–3.0 mmol/L; however, that’s not always necessarily the case. If an individual is following a ketogenic diet strictly for therapeutic reasons, one may consider trying to achieve a deeper level of ketosis, but even those with a strict regimen may see only slight elevations in ketones due to rapid uptake into tissues.
A review of multiple studies in the journal Nutrients found that ketogenic diets are connected to significant reductions in total cholesterol, increases in “good” HDL cholesterol levels, dips in triglycerides levels and decreases in “bad” LDL cholesterol; there are questions as to whether diets high in saturated fat negate these benefits. The same paper reports that a ketogenic may slightly reduce blood pressure, but science is still very scant on this point.

Breath Ketone Analysis: This method analyzes an individual’s breath to determine whether or not they are producing ketones, specifically, acetone. While this method has also been found to be an effective indicator, more research needs to be done to examine how this compares to blood testing. Studies investigating breath analyzers have found that these devices serve as a reliable indicator of ketosis.[19]
The low glycemic index treatment (LGIT)[49] is an attempt to achieve the stable blood glucose levels seen in children on the classic ketogenic diet while using a much less restrictive regimen. The hypothesis is that stable blood glucose may be one of the mechanisms of action involved in the ketogenic diet,[9] which occurs because the absorption of the limited carbohydrates is slowed by the high fat content.[5] Although it is also a high-fat diet (with approximately 60% calories from fat),[5] the LGIT allows more carbohydrate than either the classic ketogenic diet or the modified Atkins diet, approximately 40–60 g per day.[18] However, the types of carbohydrates consumed are restricted to those that have a glycaemic index lower than 50. Like the modified Atkins diet, the LGIT is initiated and maintained at outpatient clinics and does not require precise weighing of food or intensive dietitian support. Both are offered at most centres that run ketogenic diet programmes, and in some centres they are often the primary dietary therapy for adolescents.[9]

if you are not eating organic or wild red and other meats and also ensuring they’ve not been vaccinated with “the usual” poisons that is so ‘mainstream’ now and putting all of humanity at risk, you’re putting yourself and even your offspring at huge risk! Any benefit you may want to derive from following a ketogenic or any diet is pointless in light of what science has known and proven over 20 years ago and which mainstream health care professionals and providers are, respectfully, ignorant of (that’s what they’ve been led to believe by those invested in pharma and their regulatory bodies). If you don’t believe me, watch “The Truth About Vaccines” with an open mind. You won’t regret it. (I have absolutely no investment in nor connection to the producers of that docu~series, I have simply had my “mind blown” by the facts … I’ve been a holistic health practitioner and student for over 40 years so I’m not “convinced” easily.
Before starting, ask yourself what is really realistic for you, Mattinson suggests. Then get your doctor’s okay. You may also work with a local registered dietitian nutritionist to limit potential nutrient deficiencies and talk about vitamin supplementation, as you won’t be eating whole grains, dairy, or fruit, and will eliminate many veggies. “A diet that eliminates entire food groups is a red flag to me. This isn’t something to take lightly or dive into headfirst with no medical supervision,” she says.
As for branched-chain amino acids, you'll find smart people who swear that they're keto-friendly, and others who don't. One of the BCAAs, valine, can be glucogenic, meaning that it can lead to glucose production and potentially contribute to leaving ketosis behind.[1] But does that mean it will happen? Not necessarily, particularly if you're just an occasional supplement user.
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