People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
I would love to share your journey on my blog. If you are planning to start this keto diet, please take before pictures, progress pictures, keep a food diary, and keep track of your weight and measurements. Then when you are ready maybe at your halfway point, or once you reach your goal weight, you can send me your results for me to share with others.
Implementing the diet can present difficulties for caregivers and the patient due to the time commitment involved in measuring and planning meals. Since any unplanned eating can potentially break the nutritional balance required, some people find the discipline needed to maintain the diet challenging and unpleasant. Some people terminate the diet or switch to a less demanding diet, like the modified Atkins diet or the low-glycaemic index treatment diet, because they find the difficulties too great.[42]

While a keto diet for beginners is also low in carbohydrates, it is NOT synonymous with traditional low-carbohydrate diets seen in popular media or even some scientific research. Since there is no strict definition of a “low carbohydrate diet,” some research studies utilize 30–40% carbohydrate diets and indicate that they are “low-carb.” However we now know that is roughly the same percentage as a standard American diet that has plagued our society with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Thus, while lowering carbohydrate intake in general is beneficial, it must be reinforced that traditional low-carbohydrate diets DIFFER from a well-formulated ketogenic diet.
Thank you so much for the wonderful recipes on your site. I have visited in the past and have happened upon it again. I noticed you put in the post that if anyone had questions that we could ask and so I have a big one that I need advice on if you don’t mind. I have been living low carb for about 2 years now. My weight has fluctuated from 130 to about 118. I am 5’4″ and female, 45 years old and mom to 5 children. My weight went up to 134 which is very uncomfortable to me because I have struggled with an eating disorder and so I really went low carb in an attempt to drop some weight. Well I have, but the problem is that I am restricting too many calories now. I have gotten down to 108 but know that 800 calories Is not enough. My question is about balance. I would not mind gaining some back but have a fear of gaining too much again. I don’t want to go back there. I hiit train most days for about 25 mins. I use to do way too much. Do you have a plan that would balance my calories out so I can incorporate more Low carb options/keto and start eating normal again. I like your ideas and thought process behind all you post so I would appreciate any feed back you could give to me. Thank ML
The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[13]
There are many ways in which epilepsy occurs. Examples of pathological physiology include: unusual excitatory connections within the neuronal network of the brain; abnormal neuron structure leading to altered current flow; decreased inhibitory neurotransmitter synthesis; ineffective receptors for inhibitory neurotransmitters; insufficient breakdown of excitatory neurotransmitters leading to excess; immature synapse development; and impaired function of ionic channels.[7]
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